Reviewed: “The Copenhagen Connection” by Elizabeth Peters

The Copenhagen ConnectionI bought this book for $1 at my local dollar store. I feel kind of bad saying it, since I saw that the author recently died – while I was reading the book, but I’m glad I didn’t spend more than $1 on it.

It’s not really my cup of tea, as it were.

SPOILERS AHEAD…

It was published by Avon, which I know is a romance publisher, but there’s hardly romance in this story and the back of the book lists it as a “mystery romance.” Missing from the story along with romance is mystery. Mystery should mean suspense and, well, something mysterious.

This book is about Elizabeth Jones, not to be confused with the author Elizabeth Peters (and I was briefly confused by this), who is going on a trip to Copenhagen. Lo and behold, her hero author, Margaret Rosenberg, is on the same flight. Margaret is somehow related to Danish aristocracy, although I feel like I was never quite sure how or why, and she’s going to Denmark to write a fictional book, I think, about the long dead Queen Margaret, as opposed to the still living, in Non-Fiction Land and Fiction Land alike, Queen Margaret II.

There are far too many Margarets in this story, by the way.

So Author Margaret’s assistant gets whacked, broken arm is all, at the airport and Mary-Sue like Elizabeth volunteers to fill in because, of course, she also happens to work for the firm that does Margaret’s publicity. Kooky Author Margaret agrees, much to her prim and proper son Christian’s dismay.

Christian isn’t a fan of his mother, for reasons that seem no deeper than she annoys him sometimes, and he isn’t a fan of Elizabeth. Yet because, of course, they will be “the” couple in this romance.

And this is where the author lost me.

There’s something about a bathrobe belong to one Margaret or another, lots of Copenhagen tourist-y stuff, a kidnapping of one Margaret by a bumbling band of fools, a kidnapping of Elizabeth and Christian (giving them excellent time to fall in love), and then everyone lives happily ever after.

Some time is spent in a tomb.

I still don’t know whose bathrobe I was supposed to care about and why.

But the biggest mystery of all is why there’s a pig on the cover of the book…

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